Coffee Chat with Keep Kids Alive Drive 25

18 Jul

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Tom Everson, Executive Director of Keep Kids Alive Drive 25, intentionally uses the phrase “traffic incident” rather than “traffic accident.” He chooses “incident” over “accident” because 94% of traffic-related deaths are attributed to behavior.

At the June Coffee Chat, Tom shared that the main objective of Keep Kids Alive Drive 25 (KKAD25) is to make streets safer for everyone, starting in neighborhoods. KKAD25 implements their mission by educating and engaging the public on road safety. Perhaps their most well-known approach to this objective is their catchy and important safety signs distributed around the world.  Continue reading

Omaha Needs a Transportation System Fit for a 21st Century Metropolitan City

14 Jun

Omaha Metro has two Bus Rapid Transit meetings Wednesday, June 15, 11am-1pm at the at First National Bank Winter Gardens and 4:30-6:30pm UNO Durham Science Center to give an update and to seek public input on the configuration of the BRT vehicles.BRT meeting

The mode share findings below highlight the need to move quickly with BRT, continue other Metro bus system improvements, and create more inviting walking and biking infrastructure, along with doing more to promote these non-single occupancy vehicle (SOV) modes to move people. Omaha’s increasing SOV trend is not sustainable monetarily, environmentally, and will negatively impact our quality of life with increased traffic and air pollution.

The American Community Survey* is an annual survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. While a recent Citylab article focused on age groups and car usage across the U.S. for one year, here we highlight the trends of five modes of commuting to work in the Omaha area. Please note the boundaries and restrictions of the data include: 1) Data is from commuting to work only. Thus trips to retail, recreation, etc., are not measured in these numbers. 2) The survey only allows a person to specify one mode of commuting. Thus those who use multiple modes, and the share of each mode used, are not delineated. Continue reading

Coffee Chat with Omaha Parks & Recreation

8 Jun FullSizeRender

The Omaha area has more than 120 miles of paved multi-use trails that enable people on bikes or on foot to safely commute to school, work or other destinations; or to use for recreational purposes. The Papio-Missouri River Natural Resources District and City of Omaha Parks, Recreation and Public Property are the two public agencies that play key roles in building and maintaining this trail system.

Mode Shift invited Dennis Bryers from Omaha Parks and Recreation to our May Coffee Chat to talk about the latest updates on Omaha’s trails. Continue reading